Research

Susan Jones represented the National American Institute of Architects on the 18-person International Code Council’s Tall Wood Building Committee between 2016 -2019 to change our national building codes to all Tall Wood High Rise buildings up to 18 stories. Codes were ratified successfully by wide margins in January 2019, and have been adopted in Washington, Oregon and Utah.

Susan Jones represented the National American Institute of Architects on the 18-person International Code Council’s Tall Wood Building Committee between 2016 -2019 to change our national building codes to all Tall Wood High Rise buildings up to 18 stories. Codes were ratified successfully by wide margins in January 2019, and have been adopted in Washington, Oregon and Utah.

Codes were ratified successfully by wide margins in January 2019, and have been adopted in Washington, Oregon and Utah.

Codes were ratified successfully by wide margins in January 2019, and have been adopted in Washington, Oregon and Utah.

lower carbon design

atelierjones has undertaken a sustained program of applied research to introduce Mass Timber into the building technology supply chain throughout the United States. After building four demonstration projects in the Pacific Northwest, between 2014-2017, Susan Jones then joined the International Code Council’s Tall Wood Building Code Committee to change our national codes. Representing over 90,000 architects in the United States, she and the 18-person committee along with an international body of stakeholders spent two years changing national building codes to allow Tall Wood buildings in the United States, up to 18 stories. As a lower-carbon technology, Mass Timber seeks to reduce GreenHouse Gas Emissions by 15-30% as compared to traditional concrete and steel mid-highrise buildings.

Fire Test No. 3, at the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms outside of Washington DC, showing a Mass Timber compartment structure being burned for up to four hours without sprinklers to test the fire capacity of Mass Timber. Photo: Susan Jones

Fire Test No. 3, at the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms outside of Washington DC, showing a Mass Timber compartment structure being burned for up to four hours without sprinklers to test the fire capacity of Mass Timber. Photo: Susan Jones

Fire Test No. 2, at the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms outside of Washington DC, showing the mass timber roof panel being lifted out, after burning for four hours without sprinklers. Photo: Jason Smart, American Wood Council.

Fire Test No. 2, at the US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms outside of Washington DC, showing the mass timber roof panel being lifted out, after burning for four hours without sprinklers. Photo: Jason Smart, American Wood Council.

life safety: mass timber fire research

atelierjones helped write the Fire Test Protocols for the five Fire Tests as engaged upon by the International Code Council’s Tall Wood Building research in 2017. Five fire tests were conducted to test the capacity of Mass Timber to withstand and restrain Compartment Fires in real-life fire conditions. All tests met or exceeded modeling expectations and formed the basis of the rationale and performance criteria for the Tall Wood Building Codes, ratified in 2019.